Clarification of comments by NTC President Debra Foxcroft Jan. 16, 2015 on The Peak Radio, Port Alberni

Published on January 16, 2015

The NTC would like to thank The Peak radio for inviting us to comment on the high numbers of missing and murdered indigenous women in Canada, and on MP James Lunney’s recent statements. 

Ms. Foxcroft would like to clarify one of the paraphrased statements in the radio story, which may have given listeners the impression this issue does not touch us here at home and is only an issue on Vancouver’s East Side and around Prince George’s Highway of Tears.

While most of the missing and murdered First Nations in BC were living in those areas, this issue has also impacted our people.  While there may be no recent cases ofmissing and murdered women or girls from Nuu-chah-nulth communities, she is aware that there are historical cases involving Nuu-chah-nulth women and girls, including those living in or away from their communities.  She wishes to refrain from mentioning particular names as this may cause pain to the family members.

Her heart goes out to the families and communities of these women. She acknowledges the heartbreaking difficulty of not knowing what has happened to a loved one who has gone missing, or the profound loss of a wife, mother, grandmother, aunty or daughter whose life has been taken away too soon.  She also recognizes the challenge of having these cases discussed by Canada’s politicians in such a cold and dismissive way.

Nuu-cha-nulth traditions teach us to respect and honour our women as givers of life. The Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council is committed to supporting and promoting healthy, safe and respectful communities. The safety and well-being of our women and girls is one of our highest priorities.

The NTC would like to thank The Peak radio for inviting us to comment on the high numbers of missing and murdered indigenous women in Canada, and on MP James Lunney’s recent statements. 

Ms. Foxcroft would like to clarify one of the paraphrased statements in the radio story, which may have given listeners the impression this issue does not touch us here at home and is only an issue on Vancouver’s East Side and around Prince George’s Highway of Tears.

While most of the missing and murdered First Nations in BC were living in those areas, this issue has also impacted our people.  While there may be no recent cases ofmissing and murdered women or girls from Nuu-chah-nulth communities, she is aware that there are historical cases involving Nuu-chah-nulth women and girls, including those living in or away from their communities.  She wishes to refrain from mentioning particular names as this may cause pain to the family members.

Her heart goes out to the families and communities of these women. She acknowledges the heartbreaking difficulty of not knowing what has happened to a loved one who has gone missing, or the profound loss of a wife, mother, grandmother, aunty or daughter whose life has been taken away too soon.  She also recognizes the challenge of having these cases discussed by Canada’s politicians in such a cold and dismissive way.

Nuu-cha-nulth traditions teach us to respect and honour our women as givers of life. The Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council is committed to supporting and promoting healthy, safe and respectful communities. The safety and well-being of our women and girls is one of our highest priorities.

Date: 

Friday, January 16, 2015